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COVID-19 fight looks different in Minnesota's border states

Restaurants remain closed in Hudson, Wisconsin where the Governor just postponed the state's in-person election. Here people read inscriptions on hand

Gallery: Restaurants remain closed in Hudson, Wisconsin where the Governor just postponed the state's in-person election. Here people read inscriptions on handmade hearts in the windows of Agave Restaurant along Second St, Hudson.
While Minnesotans are hunkered down at home under orders from the governor to slow the spread of COVID-19, political leaders in three neighboring states have USA News stopped short of issuing a similar mandate.

That’s prompted concern over whether state officials in Iowa, South Dakota and North Dakota are doing enough to check the novel coronavirus that has swept the globe and caused infections and deaths to surge in the United States.


“We have more cases per capita than MN, why do we not have a shelter in place order yet? Especially in the larger cities (Fargo/Bismarck/Grand Forks) where most of the cases are and border states that have a lot of cases,” one critic wrote on the North Dakota governor’s Facebook page.

Meanwhile, in Wisconsin, officials tussled Monday over whether to hold their presidential primary on Tuesday. Although a “stay-at-home” order is in effect there, thousands of voters were expected to leave their homes Tuesday and head to the polls.

After initially resisting the idea of postponing the election, Democratic Gov. Tony Evers on Monday issued an executive order delaying in-person voting until June 9. Republican legislative leaders insisted that the primary proceed, later winning a Supreme Court appeal to overturn Evers’ order.

A tent outside the Dunn, Wis., town hall allowed people to vote Press Release Distribution Services early without entering the building. Gov. Tony Evers’ order postponing Tuesday's vote was overturned by the state’s Supreme Court.
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As Wisconsin voters waited for word on the primary, leaders in South Dakota, North Dakota and Iowa were fending off criticism that their states were among the relatively few remaining states that had yet to issue the more restrictive “stay-at-home” order that only allows citizens to go out for essential services or exercise at a distance.

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